London is a cornucopia of history, museums and art

We have been so busy here in Ealing because we are only 25 minutes outside of London by using the tube.   The museums here are mostly free so you can go back when you cannot get to see everything in one visit.  I have been to the Victoria and Albert Museum two times.IMG_20180812_121612395IMG_20180812_163258822The Museum of London, which has  excellent exhibits on Roman London and the middle Ages in London.

london Roman wall remains

Remains of the Roman wall in London

the Rose theatre model

Model of the Rose Theater

shiloutte manThen there are many interesting art and theater events to see.  Here I am at Shakespeare’s Globe, where I saw an excellent production of Othello.Old Globe theater Othello linda

Old Globe theater groundlings

The Globe Theater with the groundlings

We went to see the Old Operating Theater that was opened in 1822 to do operations on poor women who were in the St. Thomas hospital.  This was done before there was any anesthetics.  There are exhibits of the primitive tools used in this theater to train new surgeons.  I could almost hear the screams of the poor women who were treated in this place.  It was closed in 1862.Old operating theater in London

Old operating table in London

The wood chips under the table was for the blood

obstetrics tools 1820 2Now to end this blog post on a more pleasant note.  We stopped by the glass blowing studio featuring Peter Layton’s latest works called Homage.  Mr. Layton was in the studio and we got to talk to him about his remarkable work.

peter layton glass artist

Artist Peter Layton next to one of his glass art works

glass worker

Glass artist blowing and shaping an art work

peter layton glassLondon is a wonderful city to explore and discover and it does not have to cost you a fortune.

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Huxley’s Birds of Prey Centre

We had an excellent experience at this bird sanctuary in Horsham , England.  It is a small center where falcons, owls and other birds are cared for.  It is apparent that each bird is a member of the human family of Julian and his staff.  You can come and look at the flying falcons on their perches and the owls in their enclosures.  I got to be one of the human perches to demonstrate the flying skills of an owl who has a wing span of 4 feet and big talons.  It was great to be so close to such a beautiful bird.linda and owlHere are some photographs of some of the birds that we got to see.Bateleur Eagle netbrown falcon face netChilean Blue Eagle netfalcon flying netfalcon question netbarn owl flight netfalcon spotted netYou could see from the way the handlers and the birds interacted that there was a  lot of love and caring between the two.handler and owl netIf you happen to be in the South east part of England I would encourage you to drop into this facility and get to know some beautiful birds up close and personal.

The Priest House, a fifteenth century timber framed hall house

We drove to West Hoathly the other day to see the Priest house museum. West Hoathly is a charming village with lots of historical houses.  Here is the Cat Inn.  It is a 16th century  building that once stood on the crossroads that went through the village. The Cat Inn West HoathlyDown the road from the Priest house is the Old Manor house.  which was built in 1628 for Mrs. Catherine Infield.  old manor house west HoathlyThe village has lots of cute little cottages.  old cottage door West HoathlyThe Priest House is a 15th century timber house.  The Priest House West HoathlyThe history of this house is interesting.  This is from Wikipedia; “The Priest House was built for the Priory of St Pancras in Lewes as an estate office to manage the land they owned around West Hoathly, but was seized by Henry VIII following the dissolution of the monasteries. Subsequently, it belonged to Anne of Cleves, Thomas Cromwell, Mary I and Elizabeth I  although there is no evidence that any of them visited the property.”  Basically, they rented out the property for extra income.

I love to tour property like this.  I always want to try to understand how people lived long ago.  This house, which is run by the Sussex Archaeological Society, has a welcoming style with booklets that tell about the furniture in each room and how they were used.  Here is a photo of the main hall.  Most of the household activities took place in this central room.The Priest House main room netThe fireplace was installed in 1580, so all the heating and cooking is done here.The Priest House fireplace netYou can see the the hot water spigot on the pot in the fireplace.The Priest House fireplace hotwaterThe bread oven is built into the side of the fireplace.  The wife would start a fire in the oven and then clean out the ashes.  She put the bread and pies into it and sealed it with a wooden door.   The Priest House bread oven netThey would use rush lights for lights.  They were made from pig fat and were cheap but smelly.  These were rush light holders. Wax candles were very expensive, and only rich people or churches could afford them.The Priest House candle holders Upstairs there is a bedroom with a cradle.  You can see that a tapestry hung on the left side of the wall to help keep out drafts from the room next door.The Priest House bedroom netThe ceiling is open faced timbers.The Priest House ceilingThere are many windows in the  house that look out into the gardens.The Priest House outside windows

And here is a little flower pot that someone added recently.  It was so cute I thought it would be a good final photo.The Priest House flower pot

Haywards Heath and Standen House in Sussex

We have been here in Haywards Heath for about a week.  We are taking care of a sweet kitty named Coco.  coco

We rented a car and drove to a nearby National Trust house called Standen House.  It was built between  1891 and 1894 and designed by architect Philip Webb for the Beale family.standen house It was designed in the Arts and Craft style, and in the interior it was decorated with William Morris carpets, fabrics and wallpapers.  Here are some photos of the wallpaper.morris wall paper blue peach

 

morris wallpaperI love this style of interior design.  This house is particularly pleasing because they have set up chairs for the visitor to sit and read about the furniture and even have letters written by family members who lived there.  It is like being invited into their family home on a lovely summer day in 1935.  Here is the dining room table set for the fruit and cheese dessert course.Standen house dining room tableThis is a photograph of the business desk that the family used; including the typewriter.  If you are careful you can hit a few keys and experience what it was like to type on one of those machines.standen house deskBut when you go down to the kitchen you are reminded that our modern stoves were not in use in the 1900s.  Here is the stove in Standen House.Standen house stoveThe gardens have been restored to what they would have looked like in the early 1900s.  There is an extensive kitchen garden with lots of healthy pumpkins, pears and flowers.pumpkina perfect pearsunflowerthistle bee 1The staff is very kind.  One gentleman sat with us on a bench for a few minuted to answer our questions about the buildings.  The cafe in the old barn has a nice range of lunch food on offer and ice cream too.

It was a delightful afternoon of historical adventuring in a lovely part of Sussex.